Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan



  Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan


Tennessee BirdWalk
 


Misty Morgan and her husband Jack Blanchard are so different that nobody can figure out exactly what they are.
Born in Buffalo, New York, Misty was a piano prodigy who entered professional music in pop combos of the sixties. In 1967 she married Jack, a wonderfully off-center songwriter, and they teamed up in Florida to perform jazz, rock, Dixieland, or anything else it took to put bread on the table. Misty hooked up all kinds of electronic devices to her piano, so the two never really needed more band members.
Jack and Misty developed a quirky "stoned" sound, something like Sonny and Cher lost in a poppy field in South Carolina. His "velvet saw" bass voice cuts across her warm dreamy alto, while underneath pulses a steady shuffle beat dotted with harmonica and steel guitar bubbles of sound. Jack's lyrics alternate between totally bizarre novelty nonsense and deeply felt social commentary. They call their distinctive creations "Jack and Misty Productions", so she can be credited as country's trailblazing female record producer. When the wacky "Tennessee Birdwalk" topped the country charts in 1970, Misty Morgan became the first woman in country music to have co-produced a Number One hit. The record crossed over to become a sizable pop hit, as well. The twosome followed this with the equally kooky "Humphrey The Camel," "Fire Hydrant #79," and "The Legendary Chicken Fairy".
But there is more to the beautiful brunette and her long-haired husband than that. "There Must Be More To Life (Than Growing Old)" and "Poor Jody" ruminate on aging. "Bethlehem Steel" is about a discouraged, homesick factory worker. "Big Black Bird" and "The Shadows Of The Leaves" have mystical love lyrics. "Changin' Times" laments the commercialization of modern life. The compelling "Somewhere In Virginia In The Rain" tells the story of a working-class pair's breaking up and reconciliation.
Jack's groaning rasp oozes with soul, while Misty's delectable, behind the beat phrasing anticipated the popularity of stylists such as Willie Nelson. Jack and Misty are still writing, recording, and performing concerts which feature original songs and light comedy.
VITAL STATISTICS:


  • Both born in May, at the Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, New York.
  • Both have blue eyes and brown hair.
  • Both had parents named John and Mary, and sisters named Virginia.
  • Both have traced ancestors to the Alsace-Lorraine area of Europe.
  • Both lived for a time in southern Ohio before moving to Florida, where they finally met.
  • Misty plays piano and electronic keyboards.
  • Jack plays electronic keyboards and slide guitar.
  • They arrange and produced their own recordings.
  • They have been Billboard's Country Duet Of The Year, and were nominated for a Grammy (for Tennessee Birdwalk).
  • They have logged 119 weeks in the top end of the national Country charts.
  • They presently live in central Florida.
Write to them at:
Jack Blanchard and Misty Morgan
PO Box 470121
Lake Monroe, FL
32747-0121
Interested parties may call:
(407) 321-5361
or contact:
Tessier-Marsh Talent, Nashville

To All The Husbands, Wives, And Couples - Try!






Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan


TRY

BREAKING NEWS: Arian Grande, (A Pop Star), Concert Ends With an Explosion - At Least 19 people are Dead & About 59 People injured

The Latest on the Ariana Grande Concert Bombing in Manchester

 Armed police at Manchester Arena after reports of an explosion at the venue during an Ariana Grande gig.

■ Nineteen people were killed and around 59 others were injured in an explosion about 10:35 p.m. on Monday in the foyer outside the main hall of the Manchester Arena.
■ Prime Minister Theresa May said the police were treating the incident as “an appalling terrorist attack.”
■ The authorities suspect the blast came from either an abandoned backpack or a suicide bomber, a senior American intelligence official said. British officials said they were investigating reports that a suicide bomber detonated an improvised device containing nuts and bolts as shrapnel.
■ The explosion occurred just as a concert by the American pop star Ariana Grande was ending. Traumatized fans, including children, screamed and ran. Ms. Grande was not injured.
■ Parents separated from their children during the mayhem were told to go to nearby hotels, where many had taken refuge. Other children were being kept in the arena.
■ The police carried out a controlled explosion near the arena but later said the suspicious material was harmless. Bomb squads continued to comb through downtown Manchester.

‘Everyone Started Crying and Screaming’

Laura Bruce, 18, was with her sister Amy, 25, in one of the Arena’s upper tiers when they heard the explosion. “Everyone below us just turned and ran,” she said. “Because we were higher up, we could not get out for five minutes. When we came out, a man walked past us, just covered in blood.”
Sophie Tedd, 25, had traveled from Darlington to attend the concert with her friend, Jessica Holmes. At the end of the concert, they heard a loud bang, and initially wondered whether “a speaker had blown.”
“Then everyone started crying and screaming,” she said. “Everyone ran out. People were pushing each other out of the way. It took a couple of minutes to get out. The police were outside, telling us to keep running, to run away from Victoria station.”

Video from inside the arena showed the surreal scene of patrons scrambling for the exits, covered in pink balloons. The balloons were part of the choreographed staging for Ms. Grande’s tour, after a segment with projections and lasers.
— Rory Smith and Ben Sisario

The Terrorism Threat in Britain

The Manchester police are working on the assumption that the deadly explosion at a young people’s concert was an act of terrorism. If so, it would be the worst act of terrorism in Britain since the 2005 bombings of London’s buses and subway killed 52 people.

But British authorities, who have foiled numerous terrorist plots, will hardly be surprised. The threat level set by MI5, the domestic intelligence service has been set at “severe,” the second-highest level, for months now, meaning that they considered an attack “highly likely.” And counter-terrorism officials have been warning that as the Islamic State becomes under more and more military pressure in Iraq and Syria, it will try to strike out abroad.
-Steven Erlanger

Ariana Grande: ‘I Am So So Sorry. I Don’t Have Words.’

Anxious Relatives Gather at Hospital

At one of the hospitals, the Manchester Royal Infirmary, anxious relatives, many in tears, showed up to check in with their loved ones. Outside the pediatric emergency department, a van carrying blood supplies pulled in behind an ambulance.
The injured were being treated at six hospitals, said Chief Constable Ian Hopkins of the Greater Manchester Police. The police set up an emergency number - 0161 856 9400 - “for those who are concerned about loved ones or anyone who may have been in the area,” the chief constable said.
— Sewell Chan

Nail Bomb Believed Used in Explosion

Witnesses said that the attack appeared to involve the use of a nail bomb. Nail bombs are used to magnify the destructive power of explosives, as the shrapnel increases the bomb’s ability to wound its victims. A nail bomb was believed to have been used Monday in an attack at a military hospital in Bangkok that wounded two dozen people.
Nail bombs use shrapnel like steel balls, razors, screws and other pieces of metal to enhance their destructive capacity. They were used in Britain by the Irish Republican Army in its campaign against the British government, including in a 1981 attack in central London that killed one women and injured 50 others.
— Gerry Mullany

Controlled Explosion Afterwards

Speculation that there might be another explosive device rose hours after the blast at deaths at the concert hall when the Manchester police said they had carried out “precautionary controlled explosion in Cathedral Garden.” It turned out to have been abandoned clothing, the police said, “not a suspicious item.”
— John Harney

Attack Came After ISIS Plea

Last week, the Islamic State released a 44-minute video featuring fighters of different nationalities, enjoining their supporters back home to carry out acts of violence. Among them was a man identified as a British national, according to a translation of the video provided by the Middle East Media Research Institute, which tracks jihadi propaganda.
Besides the threat last week, ISIS has repeatedly targeted the U.K. in its propaganda, though with little effect until earlier this year.
Rukmini Callimachi

Arena Largest Such Venue in Britain

The Manchester Arena is one of the world’s busiest areas, and the largest indoor venue in Britain with a capacity of 21,000, or 18,000 for concerts. It was constructed as part of Manchester’s bid to host the Olympic games in 1996 and 2000, and is connected to the Manchester Victoria Station, which was closed due to the attack.
The Arena opened in 1995 and has hosted some of the world’s leading musical acts, including The Rolling Stones, U2, Madonna and Luciano Pavarotti. It also hosted the 2002 Commonweath Games.
— Gerry Mullany

Rail Service at Busy Hub to Remain Suspended

 Rail service at Manchester Victoria, a major transportation hub in the city, was suspended late Monday night and will remain closed on Tuesday. Manchester’s light rail service, Metrolink, has also been suspended at the station.

Manchester Victoria, which was used by more than 7 million passengers in 2015-16, is one of the busiest rail stations in England.
Matthew Haag

Firm Describes Security at Arena

The Pennsylvania-based company SMG manages the Manchester Arena, and Wes Westley, the president and CEO of the company, described the precautions at the venue.
“It is obviously as tight security as anywhere in the states,” he said in an interview. “Backpacks are not allowed. Drinks are taken away from people. You have to go through very strict security to enter the arena.”
He explained that attendees arrive through a large public foyer, which is where the explosion occurred. The area, which connects to the Manchester Victoria rail station, is where parents often wait for their children after the concerts.
The incident “occurred in a public space outside of Manchester Arena,” the company said.
— Ben Sisario

U.S. Intelligence Briefed on Attack

Intelligence officials in the United States were briefed on the Manchester explosion late Monday and were told it appeared to be a terror attack, said one senior official who was not authorized to discuss the situation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.
The Department of Homeland Security said it was monitoring the situation and it had “no information to indicate a specific credible threat involving music venues in the United States” while warning Americans in Manchester to be vigilant.
“U.S. citizens in the area should heed direction from local authorities and maintain security awareness,” the department said in a statement. “We encourage any affected U.S. citizens who need assistance to contact the U.S. Embassy in London and follow Department of State guidance.”
 — Adam Goldman and Gerry Mullany

"Tasty Tuesday" @ Raider Country's Wine & Dine...May 23th

"Tasty Tuesday" Tries to bring you

Related image
"Quick & Economical"
Appetizers..Dinners..Deserts..& Cocktails
to "YOUR PLACE"
(Check out our 'Thirsty Thursday' & 'Frying Friday' too)
Today's Suggestion

Perfect Banana Pudding Recipe





Look no further for the banana pudding of your dreams.

 
Total Time:
Prep:
Level: Easy
Serves: 10

Ingredients

  • 1 1/3 c. milk
  • 1 package instant vanilla pudding mix
  • 1 can sweetened condensed milk (14 oz.)
  • 3 c. heavy cream
  • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 1 box vanilla wafer cookies (12 oz.)
  • 4 bananas, sliced into coins
  • 2 tsp. sugar

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine milk, vanilla pudding mix and sweetened condensed milk. Whisk thoroughly, breaking up any lumps, and refrigerate for at least 5 minutes, or until set.
  2. In another large bowl, combine heavy cream and vanilla. Beat until stiff peaks form, 2 to 3 minutes. Set aside half of the mixture for topping the dish. Fold remaining half into the pudding mixture.
  3. Cover the bottom of a 3-quart trifle dish with vanilla wafers. Top with one-third of the pudding mixture. Cover with another layer of the wafer cookies—you may want to also stand some cookies up vertically, so you see the full circle along the edge of the trifle dish. Top with an even layer of banana slices. Continue layering the pudding, wafer cookies and banana slices until you reach the top, ending with a final layer of banana pudding.
  4. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours, or up to overnight.
  5. Sweeten the remaining whipped cream: Add sugar to whipped cream, stirring to combine. Just before serving, dollop on top of the banana pudding, then sprinkle crumbled wafer cookies on top.

Today in Country Music History...May 23, 2017




2015
Jason Aldean's "Tonight Looks Good On You" video premieres on CMT

2012
Reba McEntire sings "Turn On The Radio" with contestant Skylar Laine on the season finale of FOX-TV's "American Idol," live from Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. Carrie Underwood and Scotty McCreery attend as competitor Jessica Sanchez covers "I Will Always Love You"

2011
The Luke Bryan video for "Country Girl (Shake It For Me)" premieres on CMT

2010
Ferlin Husky and songwriter/producer Billy Sherrill are inducted in the Country Music Hall of Fame in the official medallion ceremony

2009
Sugarland's "It Happens" goes to #1 on the Billboard country singles chart

2006
Brad Paisley claims three trophies at the 41st annual Academy of Country Music awards, aired by CBS from the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. The Dolly Parton duet, "When I Get Where I'm Going," takes Vocal Event and Video of the Year; "Time Well Wasted" is Album

1981
Rosanne Cash nets her first #1 country single in Billboard with "Seven Year Ache"

1974


Singer/songwriter Jewel Kilcher is born in Payson, Utah. Known professionally as Jewel, she gets established as a pop star in 1996, segueing into the country charts with the 2008 single "Stronger Woman"

1958
Shelly West is born in Cleveland, Ohio. The daughter of Dottie West, she shares the Country Music Association's Vocal Duo of the Year honor with David Frizzell in 1981 and '82, and earns three solo hits in '83, led by "Jose Cuervo"

1925
Mac Wiseman is born in Crimora, Virginia. He works as a sideman for Bill Monroe and Flatt & Scruggs, and releases his own solo bluegrass records for the Dot label. Wiseman also serves as a founding member of the Country Music Association and joins the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2014

May 23rd...This Day in History (Now with links to other events) + "History Footage Video"

Police kill famous outlaws Bonnie and Clyde 1934

 Image result for bonnie & clyde images

SPECIAL HISTORY FOOTAGE OF:
"The End of Bonnie & Clyde"



To Hear the Ballad of Bonnie & Clyde and Watch the Video
Visit Our Sister Site - RememberRadio.net

On this day in 1934, notorious criminals Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are shot to death by Texas and Louisiana state police while driving a stolen car near Sailes, Louisiana.
Bonnie Parker met the charismatic Clyde Barrow in Texas when she was 19 years old and her husband (she married when she was 16) was serving time in jail for murder. Shortly after they met, Barrow was imprisoned for robbery. Parker visited him every day, and smuggled a gun into prison to help him escape, but he was soon caught in Ohio and sent back to jail. When Barrow was paroled in 1932, he immediately hooked up with Parker, and the couple began a life of crime together.
After they stole a car and committed several robberies, Parker was caught by police and sent to jail for two months. Released in mid-1932, she rejoined Barrow. Over the next two years, the couple teamed with various accomplices to rob a string of banks and stores across five states–Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, New Mexico and Louisiana. To law enforcement agents, the Barrow Gang–including Barrow’s childhood friend, Raymond Hamilton, W.D. Jones, Henry Methvin, Barrow’s brother Buck and his wife Blanche, among others–were cold-blooded criminals who didn’t hesitate to kill anyone who got in their way, especially police or sheriff’s deputies. Among the public, however, Parker and Barrow’s reputation as dangerous outlaws was mixed with a romantic view of the couple as “Robin Hood”-like folk heroes.
Their fame was increased by the fact that Bonnie was a woman–an unlikely criminal–and by the fact that the couple posed for playful photographs together, which were later found by police and released to the media. Police almost captured the famous duo twice in the spring of 1933, with surprise raids on their hideouts in Joplin and Platte City, Missouri. Buck Barrow was killed in the second raid, and Blanche was arrested, but Bonnie and Clyde escaped once again. In January 1934, they attacked the Eastham Prison Farm in Texas to help Hamilton break out of jail, shooting several guards with machine guns and killing one.
Texan prison officials hired a retired Texas police officer, Captain Frank Hamer, as a special investigator to track down Parker and Barrow. After a three-month search, Hamer traced the couple to Louisiana, where Henry Methvin’s family lived. Before dawn on May 23, Hamer and a group of Louisiana and Texas lawmen hid in the bushes along a country road outside Sailes. When Parker and Barrow appeared, the officers opened fire, killing the couple instantly in a hail of bullets.
All told, the Barrow Gang was believed responsible for the deaths of 13 people, including nine police officers. Parker and Barrow are still seen by many as romantic figures, however, especially after the success of the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde, starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty.


 (More Events on This Day in History)

Monday, May 22, 2017

SPECIAL POST: To Wish Our Friends & Neighbors in Canada - "Happy Victoria Day"

Victoria Day

 Image result for victoria day in canada images

 

Victoria Day (French: Fête de la Reine, or "Celebration of the Queen") is a federal Canadian public holiday celebrated on the last Monday preceding May 25, in honour of Queen Victoria's birthday. As such, it is the Monday between the 18th to the 24th inclusive, and thus is always the penultimate Monday of May. The date is simultaneously that on which the current Canadian sovereign's official birthday is recognized.[1] It is sometimes informally considered the beginning of the summer season in Canada.
The holiday has been observed in Canada since at least 1845, originally falling on Victoria's actual birthday (24 May 1819). It continues to be celebrated in various fashions across the country; the holiday has always been a distinctly Canadian observance.[2][3] Victoria Day is a federal statutory holiday, as well as a holiday in six of Canada's ten provinces and all three of its territories. In Quebec, before 2003, the Monday preceding 25 May of each year was unofficially the Fête de Dollard, a commemoration of Adam Dollard des Ormeaux initiated in the 1920s to coincide with Victoria Day. In 2003, provincial legislation officially created National Patriots' Day on the same date.

History

The birthday of Queen Victoria was a day for celebration in Canada long before Confederation, with the first legislation regarding the event being in 1845 passed by the parliament of the Province of Canada to officially recognize May 24 as the Queen's birthday.[4][2][3] It was noted that on that date in 1854, the 35th birthday of Queen Victoria, some 5,000 residents of Canada West gathered in front of Government House (near present-day King and Simcoe Streets in Toronto) to "give cheers to their queen".[5] An example of a typical 19th century celebration of the Queen's birthday took place on May 24, 1866, in Omemee, also in Canada West: the town mounted a day-long fête to mark the occasion, including a gun salute at midnight, pre-dawn serenades, picnics, athletic competitions, a display of illuminations, and a torch-light procession;[6] such events were common around the colony and,[2] by the 1890s, the day had become a "patriotic holiday".[3]

Following the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, May 24 was made by law to be known as Victoria Day,[2][4] a date to remember the late queen, who was deemed the "Mother of Confederation",[7] and, in 1904, the same date was by imperial decree made Empire Day throughout the British Empire.[2] Over the ensuing decades, the official date in Canada of the reigning sovereign's birthday changed through various royal proclamations until the haphazard format was abandoned in 1952. That year, both Empire Day and Victoria Day were, by order-in-council and statutory amendment, respectively, moved to the Monday before May 25 and the monarch's official birthday in Canada was by regular viceregal proclamations made to fall on this same date every year between 1953 and January 31, 1957,[4][8] when the link was made permanent by royal proclamation.[4][9] The following year, Empire Day was renamed Commonwealth Day and in 1977 it was moved to the second Monday in March, leaving the Monday before May 25 only as both Victoria Day and the Queen's Birthday.
Victoria Day celebrations were marred by tragedy twice: In 1881, the passenger ferry Victoria overturned in the Thames River, near London, Ontario. The boat departed in the evening with 600 to 800 people on board—three times the allowable passenger capacity—and capsized part way across the river, drowning some 182 individuals, including a large number of children who had been with their families for Victoria Day picnics at Springbank Park. The event came to be known as the Victoria Day disaster.[10] Then, on May 26, 1896, the Point Ellice Bridge disaster occurred in Victoria, British Columbia, when a bridge collapsed under the weight of a streetcar overloaded with passengers on their way to attend Victoria Day celebrations.[11]
In 2013, a group of prominent Canadian actors, authors, and politicians sent a petition to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, requesting that the holiday be renamed Victoria and First Peoples Day.[12][13]

Provincial and territorial legislation

Most workplaces in Canada are regulated by the provincial or territorial government. Therefore, although Victoria Day is a statutory holiday for federal purposes, whether an employee is entitled to a paid day off generally depends on the province or territory of residence (with the exception of employees in federally regulated workplaces such as banks).
The status of Victoria Day in each of the provinces and territories is as follows: It is a general holiday in Alberta,[14] Manitoba,[15] the Northwest Territories,[16] and Yukon[17] and is a statutory holiday in British Columbia,[18] Ontario,[19] and Saskatchewan.[20] Victoria Day is not a paid public holiday in Newfoundland and Labrador,[21] but is a government holiday;[22] Nova Scotia, where it is also not a designated retail closing day, but is considered a "non-statutory holiday";[23] and Prince Edward Island,[24] although provincial legislation defines "holiday" to include Victoria Day.[25]
In Nunavut[26] and New Brunswick,[27] the date is set as a general holiday (for New Brunswick, a prescribed day of rest on which retail businesses must be closed[28]) to mark the reigning sovereign's official birthday. In Quebec, the province's legislative assembly passed legislation that dedicated National Patriots' Day, commemorating the patriotes of the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837, to be celebrated on the Monday preceding May 25. This replaced the Fête de Dollard, which had been celebrated by Quebecers on Victoria Day since the 1960s and which commemorated Adam Dollard des Ormeaux.

Practice

Canada is the only country that commemorates Queen Victoria with an official holiday.[29] Federal government protocol dictates that, on Victoria Day, the Royal Union Flag is to be flown from sunrise to sunset at all federal government buildings—including airports, military bases, and other Crown owned property across the country—where physical arrangements allow (i.e. where a second flag pole exists, as the Royal Union Flag can never displace the national flag).[4]
Several cities hold a parade on the holiday, with the most prominent being that which has taken place since 1898 in the monarch's namesake city of Victoria, British Columbia.[30][31] In nearby New Westminster, the Victoria Day weekend is distinguished by the Hyack Anvil Battery Salute, a tradition created during colonial times as a surrogate for a 21-gun salute: Gunpowder is placed between two anvils, the top one upturned, and the charge is ignited, hurling the upper anvil into the air. Other celebrations include an evening fireworks show, such as that held at Ashbridge's Bay Beach in the east end of Toronto, and at Ontario Place, in the same city.

Across the country, Victoria Day serves as the unofficial marker of the end of the winter social season, and thus the beginning of the summer social calendar.[2][3][32] Banff, Alberta's Sunshine Village ends its lengthy ski season on Victoria Day and,[33] likewise, it is during this long weekend that many summer businesses—such as parks, outdoor restaurants, bicycle rentals, city tour operators, etc.—will open. Victoria Day is also a mark of the beginning of the cottage season, when cottage owners may reverse the winterization of their property.[34][35] Gardeners in Canada will similarly regard Victoria Day as the beginning of spring,[35] as it falls at a time when one can be fairly certain that frost will not return until the next autumn. There is also a change in fashion: lighter-coloured summer clothing was traditionally worn from Victoria Day through until Labour Day.[36]
The holiday is colloquially known in parts of Canada as May Two-Four;[37][38][39][40][41] a double entendre that refers both to the date around which the holiday falls (May 24) and the Canadian slang for a case of twenty-four beers (a "two-four"), a drink popular during the long weekend.[2] The holiday weekend may also be known as May Long or May Run,[40][42][43] and the term Firecracker Day was also employed in Ontario.[44]
A traditional, short song about Victoria Day went as follows: "The twenty-fourth of May / Is the Queen's birthday; / If they don't give us a holiday / We'll all run away!"[3] The holiday is referenced in the song "Lakeside Park" by Canadian rock band Rush, from their 1975 album Caress of Steel. The song features the line, "everyone would gather on the 24th of May, sitting in the sand to watch the fireworks display".