Wednesday, March 8, 2017

(BROUGHT BACK) Mid-week Country Music Countdown & Country Music News..March 8, 2017







COUNTRY CHART Weekend of March 4-5:

1 LITTLE BIG TOWN Better Man
2 CHRIS YOUNG Sober Saturday Night
3 BRAD PAISLEY Today
4 MICHAEL RAY Think A Little Less
5 JON PARDI Dirt On My Boots *
6 DUSTIN LYNCH Seein’ Red
7 ERIC CHURCH Kill A Word
8 LAUREN ALAINA Road Less Traveled
9 THOMAS RHETT Star Of The Show
10 LUKE BRYAN Fast
11 JASON ALDEAN Any Ol’ Barstool
12 BRANTLEY GILBERT The Weekend
13 KELSEA BALLERINI Yeah Boy
14 JOSH TURNER Hometown Girl
15 KENNY CHESNEY Bar At The End of the World
16 GARTH BROOKS Baby Let’s Lay Down & Dance
17 HIGH VALLEY Make You Mine
18 DIERKS BENTLEY Black
19 TRENT HARMON There’s A Girl
20 SAM HUNT Body Like a Back Road


  


 

Keith Urban Celebrates “Blue Ain’t Your Color” in Nashville

Kicks Off No. 1 Party by Singing Latest Hit With Its Songwriters

Keith Urban‘s performance of “Blue Ain’t Your Color” at Friday’s (March 3) No. 1 party marked a full circle moment for songwriter Steven Lee Olsen.
Urban shared the stage at Nashville’s Basement East with the Toronto native and co-writers Clint Lagerberg and Hillary Lindsey, honoring Olsen’s first No. 1.
For years, Olsen has been one of Urban’s biggest fans, moving to Nashville 11 years ago after seeing the “Somebody Like You” music video on CMT Canada.
“I remember playing my guitar in my mom’s living room,” he recalled, “and I remember it was the first time it made me realize that I didn’t have to be anything I wasn’t. That being said it gave me the courage to move to Nashville.”
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” was originally intended for Olsen’s full-length debut as an artist. He wouldn’t let his publisher Cornman Music pitch the song to any artist because he wanted it exclusively for his own album. But when Urban’s camp called looking for material for his Ripcord album, Olsen has happy to give the waltz away.
Urban fell in love with the song as soon as he heard it and understood the gravity of Olsen’s decision to let him have the song.
“As a writer,” Urban said, “I so understand the conundrum of writing a song like that and knowing, ‘This could either be the launching vehicle for me. What do I do?’ I cannot thank you enough for believing in me to do that song. That means the world to me because I value that song as much as you do. I know what that means to you to create something like that. They’re rare. You don’t just give them away. Thank you so much for believing in me.”
The title originally came to Olsen at midnight after a nap on the couch at home. The TV was on when he saw the word “Blue” on the screen. He saved the idea in a note on his phone and presented it to Lagerberg and Lindsey to help him finish it.
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” is Urban’s fourth consecutive No. 1 from Ripcord. It was nominated for best country song at the 59th annual Grammy Awards in February, and it’s currently nominated for the ACM’s song of the year and single record of the year.
When Capitol Nashville president and CEO Mike Dungan presented commemorative trophies to the songwriters, he shared some statistics reflecting the song’s popularity. “Blue Ain’t Your Color” was among the biggest all-genre songs on Spotify in 2016. For 11 weeks, the song was the No. 1 most downloaded country song with 840,000 tracks sold. It peaked at No. 1 on Billboard‘s country airplay chart in January.
Dungan also presented plaques for Ripcord debuting at No. 1 in the United States, Australia and Canada and for “Blue Ain’t Your Color” being the most-streamed country song for 13 weeks. Billboard‘s Jim Asker presented a plaque for 37 Top 10 career singles. Pandora’s Beville Dunkerley presented a plaque commemorating Urban’s cumulative 2 billion audio streams as well as 40 million streams thus far for the song.
Before leaving the stage, Urban acknowledged that 2017 marks his 20th year as a signed recording artist with Capitol Nashville.
“I feel exactly the same as I moved to town in ’92,” Urban said. “I don’t feel any different. I go into the studio excited, curious, scared and feeling like I don’t know what the hell I’m doing.
“I heard someone say recently that humility is just remaining teachable, and I think for me, I’m so teachable because I’m so fascinated, curious, hungry and passionate about music — about where it can go and what it can do. That just keeps me humming along. I have the most incredible family at home. It makes all of this real.”
The event ran approximately two hours with speeches and award presentations from Billboard, Country Radio Broadcasters, Pandora and praises from each songwriters’ publishers. The long run time was to be expected to celebrate such a smash. 


  

Carly Pearce Recalls “Every Little Thing”

CMT Next Women of Country Singer-Songwriter Dazzles in Moody Debut Music Video 

Carly Pearce, you are ripping my heart out with this new single and video for “Every Little Thing.”
It’s the ultimate heartbreak anthem. Not because it focuses only on the grand and obvious moments of a past relationship, but because it focuses on the “little things,” and we all know those little, everyday ordinary things are what really make a relationship. Those are the memories you carry with you that creep up on you and still break your heart, no matter how much time passes.
Those are the moments we really miss when love is lost — and the ones we sometimes try not to forget because we don’t really want to let go.
Pearce perfectly captures the melancholy with the moody neon glow of her debut video, captured by director Patrick Tracy during a live session at Brown Owl Studios. Her lilting, emotive voice soaring as she sings of “the high, the hurt, the shine, the sting,” Pearce will make you feel every little thing.
Pearce co-wrote this track with Emily Shackelton and busbee, who is producing Pearce’s debut album for Big Machine Label Group. “Every Little Thing” has already reached over 1 million streams to date.






 

Where Thomas Rhett Got His Tour Name

Inspired by His Uncle’s Love of Widespread Panic 

Over the weekend, Thomas Rhett played a show just outside of Chicago. After that, he went on to play for fans in Minnesota. Then he’ll move on to Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, West Virginia and so on.
And wherever he is, he’ll be part of that city’s home team.
In a recent radio interview, Rhett explained the story behind naming his Home Town Tour.
“My Uncle Eli, when I was in about third grade, was battling leukemia,” he said. “And for an entire year, him and a buddy traveled all over the country and went to almost 200 Widespread Panic concerts.”
His uncle noticed that wherever they were, the band would start the show with a shout-out to that city.
“And Eli was just like, ‘God, everywhere they go, they’re just pulling for that town.’ So he started just making stickers and T-shirts and it just said, ‘Home Team.'”
With his uncle’s permission, Thomas Rhett brought that idea back and is using it for his own tour.
“Being in Chicago, it’s like we want to eat local, we want to drink local, we want to pull for your team. If I’m in Cleveland, I’m gonna wear a Cavaliers jersey.
“Really letting those fans know that I am from Nashville, but tonight, I’m with you,” he said.
The next stop on the Home Team Tour is Thursday (March 9) in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.


  

Hockey Night Out for Carrie Underwood

College Pals Join Her at Predators Game 

It was a good news/bad news kind of weekend for Carrie Underwood.
The bad news? Her beloved Nashville Predators lost their hockey game on Saturday (March 4) to the Chicago Blackhawks.
But no worries, because here is the good news: She was there at the Bridgestone Arena watching her husband Mike Fisher play live, and she was surrounded by her college friends.
Colton and Zach Swon, who make up the country duo The Swon Brothers, joined Underwood to cheer on her husband. Also there was Matt Eaton, founder of Purple Lion College Prep, and another classmate from Northeastern State University.
Underwood proudly tweeted that Tahlequah — the city where the main campus of NSU is located — was in the house.
The final score was 5-3, but even though the Preds lost, it feels like Underwood won.


  

Last Weekend’s Greatest Hits

The Best Tweets You Might Have Missed 
While you were busy doing your own weekend things, here is what you might have missed from the country artists you love. Jason Aldean adopted Boss, Kelsea Ballerini had airport struggles, Carrie Underwood caught up on some Walking Dead, Dierks Bentley soaked up the Vegas energy, Miranda Lambert showed off some stage accessories and Faith Hill shared an old picture from her baton-twirling days. 
 Ballerini: “When you forget your ID for the 6am flight, get a public patdown and run onto the full plane barefoot to your middle seat…”
Underwood: “That was mean @WalkingDead_AMC …real mean.”

Dierks Bentley: “vegas night 2. i now see why artists do residencies here. crazy crazy energy tonight. thank you!”
 
Meranda Lambert: “Redneck girl’s got her name on the back of her belt”-Bellamy Brothers Favorite show belt….”

Faith Hill: “I’m thinking about bringing back my killer baton skills for the tour. Maybe the outfit too!!!!”



                         
                             


Toby Keith’s Desert Island Music

Bob Seger, John Prine Join His Favorite Stack of Country Songs
 Everyone’s got one — that absolute list of music you’d want to have with you if you were ever stranded on a desert island.
I’ve always thought that was a pretty tall order for any album to be so good that you’d never, ever get tired of it. So any time I try to choose, I just can’t.
But Toby Keith has a list of favorites and he shared it with a music industry crowd when he spoke at the Country Radio Seminar last week in Nashville.
Right off the bat, with zero hesitation, he said he’d bring some Roger Miller and Willie Nelson music. And also, some Hag.
Merle Haggard was a tremendous influence on me,” Keith said. “I can remember being in second grade, and my parents played ‘Okie From Muskogee.’ And then I heard ‘Hungry Eyes.’ So when I first started to learn to play the guitar, those songs were calling me to sing.”
But his island jam would not be complete without Bob Seger.
“He was considered rock ‘n’ roll, but he always sounded like I could play his songs with an acoustic guitar,” Keith said. “The guys who would go see Seger would never go see Hag. But to me, it’s almost the same.
“If I played you three songs off each of their albums that you’d never heard, you wouldn’t be able to tell them apart. It’s just American music, is all it is”
At the last minute, Keith added one more to his list: John Prine.



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