Sunday, November 4, 2018

This Day in Country Music History...November 4, 2018 (Shania Twain released her third studio album Come On Over + others)

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November 4th: On this day

1930
Henry Horton was re-elected to a third term as governor of Tennessee, USA. Immediately, Nashville residents began withdrawing money from Caldwell-affiliated banks en masse, because Horton and the Caldwell Bank had both been involved in a scandal involving awarding contracts without bids. The story of the scandal would inspire the song "The Wreck Of The Tennessee Gravy Train" by Uncle Dave Macon.

1940
Born on this day in Lubbock, Texas, was Delbert McClinton, singer-songwriter, guitarist, harmonica player, and pianist. His highest-peaking single was "Tell Me About It", a 1992 duet with Tanya Tucker which reached #4 on the Country chart. Emmylou Harris had a #1 country hit in 1978 with McClinton's "Two More Bottles of Wine."

1975
American Country singer, Audrey Williams, (the first wife of Hank Williams) died from heart failure related to her years of alcohol and drug use at the age of 52, outliving Hank, Sr. by 22 years.

1997
Shania Twain released her third studio album Come On Over which became the best-selling country music album, by a female act. To date, the album has sold more than 40 million copies worldwide, shipped over 20 million copies in the United States, and in the UK it has sold over 3.3 million. The album debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart and stayed there for 50 non-consecutive weeks, staying in the Top Ten for 151 weeks.

2003
Dolly Parton was honored as a BMI Icon at the 2003 BMI Country Awards. She has earned over 35 BMI Pop and Country Awards throughout her prolific songwriting career.

2004
Loretta Lynn was honored as a BMI Icon at the BMI Country Awards. During her career, Lynn has written over 160 songs and released 60 albums, and has sold over 45 million records worldwide.

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