Saturday, September 17, 2016

Country Music Countdown, News, & Sports...Saturday September 17, 2016

   

COUNTRY CHART Weekend of September 17-18:

1 JAKE OWEN American Country Love Song
2 KELSEA BALLERINI Peter Pan
3 SAM HUNT Make You Miss Me
4 DIERKS BENTLEY w/ELLE KING Different For Girls
5 JUSTIN MOORE You Look Like I Need A Drink
6 WILLIAM MICHAEL MORGAN I Met a Girl
7 TUCKER BEATHARD Rock On
8 BLAKE SHELTON She’s Got a Way With Words
9 KENNY CHESNEY w/P!nk Setting The World On Fire
10 BILLY CURRINGTON It Don’t Hurt Like It Used To
11 LoCASH I Know Somebody
12 DAN & SHAY From The Ground Up
13 LUKE BRYAN Move
14 COLE SWINDELL Middle Of a Memory
15 BRETT YOUNG Sleep Without You
16 ZAC BROWN BAND Castaway
17 JASON ALDEAN A Little More Summer Time
18 BIG & RICH Lovin’ Lately
19 MIRANDA LAMBERT Vice
20 DRAKE WHITE Livin’ The Dream








How for-profit detention persists in the West

Federal policy changes only go part of the way in dismantling private immigrant detention.

 Image result for contract detention facility images

 

Last month, criminal justice and immigrant rights activists had two occasions to celebrate. The first came on Aug. 18 when the Justice Department announced it would phase out its contracts with private prisons, a decision affecting the roughly 22,000 federal inmates held in for-profit facilities.  Then, less than two weeks later, the Department of Homeland Security decided to reexamine its use of private prisons to hold immigrant detainees. In many ways, the back-to-back decisions represent a turning point in the government’s relationship with private detention, which has come under increasing scrutiny for poor conditions and opaque operations.
While the recent decisions may signal a desire to dismantle that system, they leave intact much of the private immigration detention apparatus, which has woven its way into local economies. 
Their shared history goes back to the early 2000s, when the criminal justice and immigration enforcement systems began merging, breaking a longstanding tradition of treating immigration violations as civil offenses and creating hundreds of thousands of new criminal cases — and a need for new detention space. Private prison companies have played an increasing role in that trend, spending millions on lobbying efforts for more punitive immigration laws that would increase the need for their services.
The result is a system in which undocumented immigrants — and even legal U.S. residents convicted of minor crimes — can be detained and deported over minor offenses. Many others, including women and children, are detained at the border as they attempt to cross north from Mexico. It’s an expensive practice: immigrant detention costs U.S. taxpayers $2 billion per year.

On average, more than 33,000 immigrants are held every day in a convoluted web of federal detention facilities and local jails throughout the country where they are often subject to violence, abuse, solitary confinement, and poor medical care. In addition, many facilities are in remote areas where access to legal advice is even more difficult (unlike regular criminal inmates, people charged for immigration violations are not guaranteed a lawyer, so they have to find their own attorney or represent themselves).
Although much of the scrutiny is centered on the private companies that operate detention facilities, local governments often profit from detaining immigrants too, by agreeing to house detainees on behalf of the federal government. For cash-strapped rural towns and counties, these deals, known as Intergovernmental Service Agreements, are especially appealing.
In southern New Mexico’s Doña Ana County, for instance, 270 of the 846 beds in the local jail are designated for immigrant detainees. In exchange, the county receives $62 per day from the U.S. Marshals Service, or a little over $6 million per year if all the beds are used.
Over the last several years, private prison companies have cashed in on these arrangements by contracting with local governments to run their detention facilities for them, promising that doing so will provide jobs and more revenue for the county. That’s what happened in the border town of San Luis, Arizona. In 2009, Emerald Correctional Management, a Louisiana-based private prison outfit, contracted with the city of San Luis to operate the local jail, the San Luis Regional Detention and Support Center, which primarily houses immigrant detainees and provides 100 local jobs.
The company pursued numerous contracts with federal agencies, including ICE, the U.S. Marshals Service, and Border Patrol, to house short-term immigrant detainees on their way to deportation or to other detention facilities to serve their sentences. But in the last few years, as the number of people crossing the border illegally dropped, Emerald began losing money on the 960-bed facility. Last year, it was operating at a $2 million loss, and the city received no money from the facility.
The loss of revenue hit San Luis hard, says Kay Macuil, the city attorney, noting that in the last round of budgeting, every department in the local government had to make cuts. But she’s optimistic that Emerald will find a way to make money on the facility in other ways. Recently, the company signed a contract with Bureau of Indian Affairs to house tribal prisoners in its private rehabilitation program, bringing in an additional 70 to 80 inmates per day. 
Even though the Department of Homeland Security has said that it will review its use of private prisons, officials have not yet indicated whether a decision to cancel its private prison contracts would extend to counties and cities like San Luis that contract with ICE and then subcontract with private companies. Nor has the U.S. Marshals Service indicated that it has any plans to stop housing its immigrant detainees in private facilities.
That would be good news for the San Luis and its detention center, says Macuil. She believes there will always be a need for jail-like facilities near the border as a staging ground for deportations. “You can’t just cram 300 people in a bus,” she says. 
For the DHS decision to have a meaningful impact, activists say, it would also have to be coupled with broader policy changes that reduce the size of the country’s immigrant detention system. One important change would be ending the law that requires ICE to fund 34,000 beds for immigrant detainees at any time, which critics say incentivizes keeping them filled.
“The bottom line is that ICE has the opportunity to release a lot of detainees but it’s not doing that,” says Ben Davis, a researcher for In the Public Interest, a nonprofit that studies privatization. Davis argues that less costly and more humane alternatives exist for enforcing the country’s immigration laws, such as community supervision programs or releasing people under an agreement to show up in court. 
Meanwhile, the intricate connection between law enforcement and private industry will likely continue. Even in government-run detention facilities, many of the services are often privatized, including food, healthcare, and phone calls. Though the Doña Ana County Detention Center is not privatized, outside the courthouse in Las Cruces, activist Sara Melton regularly sees three to four buses owned by private prison companies that are waiting to transport detainees to their facilities.
“There are plenty of ways to make money off detention,” she says. Here on the border, it’s a lucrative place to be. 



                               

Jason Aldean Shares Story Behind His Wedding Band

Rubber Jewelry Is Insurance Against an Injury He Can’t Afford to Experience 

It’s all fun and games until someone loses a finger, and Jason Aldean definitely does not want that to happen.
Last summer, Jimmy Fallon made headlines when he tripped on his kitchen rug and on his way down, he nearly lost his left ring finger. What happened was his wedding ring got caught on the counter top, got stuck and nearly ripped his finger completely off. The injury is called a ring avulsion, and Googling it is not recommended. The images are graphic and just plain gross.
Aldean can’t afford any hand injuries at the moment as the ACM’s reigning entertainer of the year who is the middle of his Six String Circus tour with Thomas Rhett and A Thousand Horses. And his seventh studio album They Don’t Know landed Sept. 9. There is just too much on the line.
To protect their valuable left paws from a future accident like a ring avulsion, Aldean and Fallon each wear rubber rings and keep their real wedding jewelry in safe places. Aldean gets his rubber ring from a company called Qalo, and he has several in many colors.
“If I’m hunting or whatever and it gets hung on something, it will just rip the ring off,” he says. “It won’t rip your finger off. It’s comfortable. I can play sports or do whatever, and it doesn’t scratch my guitar.”
If he doesn’t own one already, he’ll need to get a pink one for when he performs his 11th annual Concert for the Cure as part of the eighth annual Opry Goes Pink concert in Nashville on Oct. 25. That night, he will “flip the switch,” turning the Grand Ole Opry’s barn backdrop pink for two shows.
A $5 portion of every ticket sold for the event will benefit the Susan G. Komen Nashville chapter and the non-profit Women Rock for the Cure, the latter of which is an outreach program that supports young women diagnosed with breast cancer. Additionally, a portion of each ticket sold from his national tour will go to Susan G. Komen.


  

Superstars Converging for CMA’s “Forever Country” Video

30 Artists Help Celebrate 50th Anniversary of CMA Awards 
 
There’s nothing like a 1971 John Denver song to pique my interest and completely make my day.
When I set out to find out what this #ForeverCountry movement is about, that was the first clip I clicked. It was Tim McGraw singing a tiny piece of Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.”
Then I clicked on Dierks Bentley. He kept the song going with the “dark and dusty, painted on the sky” lyric.
Brad Paisley stayed on that Denver path with “almost heaven, West Virginia.”
Keith Urban added his voice with “Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River.”
And Luke Bryan came in on “to the place I belong.”
(It dawned on me after all this that watching the artists in order would have made much more sense, but hindsight’s 20/20, right?)
What I now know is that in order to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the CMA Awards, the Country Music Association Awards is creating the “Forever Country” promotion with what’s being described as “the biggest music video in country music history.”
When it’s all said and done, by Sept. 20, there will be 30 artists involved in this medley of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads,” Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again” and Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You.”
Other artists already revealed for the project include Nelson, Parton, Eric Church, Kacey Musgraves, Charley Pride, Carrie Underwood, Faith Hill, Lady Antebellum, Reba McEntire, Alabama, Darius Rucker, Rascal Flatts, Alan Jackson, Blake Shelton, Randy Travis and Trisha Yearwood.
The video reflects this year’s awards theme, “Then, Now, Forever Country.” Paisley and Underwood host the 50th annual CMA Awards from Nashville on Nov. 2 on ABC-TV.



 

Carrie Underwood: “We Don’t Want Surprised”

Prepping for Her CMA Gig Takes Practice and More Practice 
 
Obviously, Carrie Underwood is not going to just wing it when it comes to the CMA Awards in November.
One, because she seems like she always thinks things through. And two, because it is the 50th anniversary of the awards, so it is an extra special gig for Underwood and her co-host Brad Paisley.
And she told the San Diego Union Tribune newspaper that in order for the night to turn out as planned, they rehearse often.
“Hopefully, there’s no surprises. We don’t want surprised,” Underwood said. “We want things to go really smoothly. And, hopefully, we’ll be able to run through our script many, many times and feel comfortable.
“We have a lot of fun and a lot of meetings to prepare for everything. We crack each other up and stress each other out, and everything in between, because a lot of time goes into planning.”
Since it’s the anniversary of the CMA awards, there will likely be some tributes to the country artists who paved the way. Much like the way Underwood plays some country classics in her own shows.
“I think it’s important to sometimes pay homage to the incredible artists and storytellers who have come before and contributed so much,” she said. “That’s one thing country music has always done so well.”


  

Jason Aldean and Kelsea Ballerini’s New Breakup Anthem

Buckle Up and Get Ready for Lonely in “First Time Again” 
 
Breaking up is hard to do, especially in “First Time Again,” Jason Aldean’s new dramatic duet with Kelsea Ballerini from his new album They Don’t Know.
Written by Jason Boyer, Michael Tyler, Blake Bollinger and Ben Stennis, the song provides a hard look at the pain one feels when a relationship comes to an end.
Singing in the first person, Aldean plays the part of the dumped, while Ballerini plays the one who leaves on a rainy night. But both hearts feel like they’re dying inside every time there is a recollection of the love they once shared. They endure endless, sleepless nights while feeling every second of the clock tick by and put on brave faces when they’re with friends. It’s a heartache that won’t let up and won’t get better.
“We weren’t really planning on that song being a duet when I recorded it originally,” Aldean revealed during our interview for CMT.com. “My producer Michael Knox and I started talking about it a little bit. We ended up trying to get her in the studio, but she was out on tour with Rascal Flatts. Fortunately, Jay DeMarcus helped us out and recorded her vocals. He sent it to us to mix, so it worked out well.”
Aldean became one of Ballerini’s new forever fans after hearing her newest No. 1 “Peter Pan” on the radio.
“I had heard her songs and I thought she had a cool voice,” he said. “But then I heard ‘Peter Pan’ and you could hear vocally what she could do. That was when it kind of turned my head a little bit. But I’ve had a chance to hang out with her some and she’s really down to Earth and cool. I was happy to have her on there.”
By the way, everything is all good in their respective relationships. Ballerini and her Aussie boyfriend Morgan Evans have been dating for six months now, and Aldean’s wife Brittany Kerr co-stars in the sunny cinematic new video for his new single “A Little More Summertime.”
 
 
  

Eric Church’s Vice Advice

He Shares Some Thoughts About Drinking and Smoking 
 
Sure, Eric Church has a few vices. Just like we all do. Drinking and smoking and feasting. So I guess it should come as no surprise that he also has some pretty solid advice for how to be at your best even when you might be up to your worst.
In a conversation with Men’s Journal, he offered a few observations.
After one of those nights: “Well, the great thing about screwing up when you’re drunk is you can blame it on being drunk. Whatever you do, it’s just, ‘Honey, I was drunk.’ Blame it on the booze. Even if you’re not that drunk, blame it on the booze.”
On picking your poison wisely: “Tequila and I just don’t get along. There’s certain things I can drink. Whiskey. I can drink Jack Daniel’s all night. We like each other. Tequila and I don’t like each other.”
Why he prefers edibles: “I do more of the edibles now just because the smoking part sucking for me vocally. I mean, it’s one of those things I’m not ashamed of. It’s something I enjoy. It’s escapism. I do it responsibly.”
On maintaining a healthy diet: “I think 21-year-old Eric would tell me as I approach 40 not to eat so much late-night pizza and a 12-pack of beer before you go crawl into bed and (expect it to) turn into muscle.”




MLB
Standings
 
American League
 
#

AL East
W
L
PCT
GB
HOME
AWAY
L10
1
83
64
.565
-
44-32
39-32
7-3
2
81
66
.551
2.0
46-26
35-40
6-4
-
81
66
.551
2.0
42-32
39-34
4-6
4
77
70
.524
6.0
44-31
33-39
5-5
5
63
84
.429
20.0
35-40
28-44
5-5
#
AL Central
W
L
PCT
GB
HOME
AWAY
L10
1
85
62
.578
-
48-25
37-37
6-4
2
78
69
.531
7.0
42-32
36-37
3-7
3
74
73
.503
11.0
42-30
32-43
3-7
4
72
75
.490
13.0
41-33
31-42
7-3
5
55
93
.372
30.5
29-46
26-47
4-6
#
AL West
W
L
PCT
GB
HOME
AWAY
L10
1
88
60
.595
-
48-22
40-38
6-4
2
78
69
.531
9.5
40-32
38-37
8-2
3
77
70
.524
10.5
41-33
36-37
4-6
4
64
83
.435
23.5
33-42
31-41
6-4
5
63
84
.429
24.5
33-40
30-44
1-9


National League 
 
#

NL East
W
L
PCT
GB
HOME
AWAY
L10
1
88
59
.599
-
46-28
42-31
8-2
2
78
69
.531
10.0
39-33
39-36
7-3
3
73
74
.497
15.0
36-35
37-39
5-5
4
66
82
.446
22.5
33-41
33-41
4-6
5
56
91
.381
32.0
24-49
32-42
2-8
#
NL Central
W
L
PCT
GB
HOME
AWAY
L10
1
94
53
.639
-
52-21
42-32
5-5
2
76
71
.517
18.0
33-41
43-30
3-7
3
72
74
.493
21.5
36-38
36-36
5-5
4
66
82
.446
28.5
39-36
27-46
5-5
5
62
84
.425
31.5
36-39
26-45
5-5
#
NL West
W
L
PCT
GB
HOME
AWAY
L10
1
83
64
.565
-
47-27
36-37
6-4
2
79
68
.537
4.0
40-33
39-35
6-4
3
70
77
.476
13.0
38-35
32-42
4-6
4
62
85
.422
21.0
33-38
29-47
5-5
-
62
85
.422
21.0
29-47
33-38
4-6





  • What: Sprint Cup circuit
  • Where: Chicagoland Speedway, Joliet, IL
  • When: Sep 18, 2016, 2:46 PM
  • Race Length: 401.00
 








Thu, Sep 15 cbs, NFLN TOTAL 1234OT
 





Sun, Sep 18 fox GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 fox GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 fox GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 1:00 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 fox GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 4:05 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 fox GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 4:05 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 4:25 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 4:25 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 cbs GET TICKETS
(0-1-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 4:25 PM ET
Sun, Sep 18 nbc GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(1-0-0)
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Game Center 8:30 PM ET
Mon, Sep 19 espn GET TICKETS
(1-0-0)
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(0-1-0)
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Game Center 8:30 PM ET





NFL Lines For Week 2 - NFL Football Line Week Two
NFL Line 9/18 - 9/19, 2016


Date & Time Favorite Line Underdog Total
9/18 1:00 ET At Detroit -6 Tennessee 47
9/18 1:00 ET At Houston -2 Kansas City 43
9/18 1:00 ET At New England -6.5 Miami 42
9/18 1:00 ET Baltimore -6.5 At Cleveland 42.5
9/18 1:00 ET At Pittsburgh -3.5 Cincinnati 48.5
9/18 1:00 ET At Washington -2.5 Dallas 45.5
9/18 1:00 ET At NY Giants -5 New Orleans 53.5
9/18 1:00 ET At Carolina -13.5 San Francisco 45
9/18 4:05 ET At Arizona -7 Tampa Bay 50
9/18 4:05 ET Seattle -6.5 At Los Angeles 38
9/18 4:25 ET At Denver -6.5 Indianapolis 46.5
9/18 4:25 ET At Oakland -4.5 Atlanta 49
9/18 4:25 ET At San Diego -3 Jacksonville 47
9/18 8:30 ET Green Bay -2.5 At Minnesota 43.5
 
 
Monday Night Football Line





9/19 8:35 ET At Chicago -3 Philadelphia 42.5     

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